Using the SharePoint Guidance 2010

The Patterns & Practices SharePoint 2010 Guidance is something rather for advanced developers and I was curious what exactly is in this stack. After the first glance I believe the stuff is really good and the included SharePoint Guidance Library looks like a huge benefit. Therefore I was tempted to try and use those libraries immediately at my own. Hence fore I have decided to retailor my previously published example Another walkthrough of enabling CRUD BCS for SP2010 in order to start from the scratch with those libraries.

Just to remind you, in the mentioned solution I was utilizing Business Connectivity Services and have created an external list accessing the Northwind database via Entity Framework. In that solution the connection string was written directly into the Web-Application’s web.config file (as matter of fact it is open for discussions whether such approach truly fits into the overall design requirements).

In this version of that former example I will put the connection string rather into the Web-Application’s setting using the Guidance Library’s Service Locator and the Application Setting Manager. Basically this new solution’s BDC model was slightly extended. Next to the Customer entity I have added the related Orders entity as well. Here the steps to follow in order to accomplish the plan.

Firstly of course you have to download and extract the above mentioned guidance. Next you could install the guidance’s two base libraries into the GAC and reference them from within all of your SharePoint 2010 development solutions:

  1. Microsoft.Practices.SharePoint.Common.dll
  2. Microsoft.Practices.ServiceLocation.dll

Also note (in my humble opinion) that it could make sense integrating these libraries into the overall SharePoint 2010 infrastructure prerequisite. This is however matter of another discussions.

The first change introducing the guidance libraries affects our event receiver (Picture 1) which was previously intended to inject the appropriate <connectionStrings> element into the web.config. In this version I’m going to replace that code details using the Application Setting Manager, thus the connection string will be a hardwired setting of the deployment package. Activating the feature, the Setting Manager will simply insert that prepared connections string into a SPWebApplication-level property bag (Code 1). The connection string is later retrievable using the predefined string Key NorthwindEntitiesConnectionString.

Also note, that here the connection string is concatenated rather only for more readability and it does NOT reflect any best practices in this regard. As best practice could be instead the utilization of the classes EntityConnection and the EntityConnectionStringBuilder like this msdn article describes.

 image

Picture 1

public override void FeatureActivated(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties)
{
   IServiceLocator serviceLocator =
           SharePointServiceLocator.GetCurrent();
   IConfigManager configManager =
          serviceLocator.GetInstance<IConfigManager>();

   // Web-Application (SPWebApplication)
   SPWebApplication webApplication = properties.Feature.Parent as SPWebApplication;
   if (webApplication != null)
   {
      SPSite siteCollection = webApplication.Sites[0];
      if (siteCollection != null)
      {
         configManager.SetWeb(siteCollection.RootWeb);
         IPropertyBag bag = configManager.GetPropertyBag(ConfigLevel.CurrentSPWebApplication);
         configManager.SetInPropertyBag(
           “NorthwindEntitiesConnectionString”,
           “metadata=res://*/Model1.csdl|res://*/Model1.ssdl|res://*/Model1.msl;”+
           “provider=System.Data.SqlClient;” +
           “provider connection string=’Data Source=.\\sqlexpress;” +
           “Initial Catalog=Northwind;” +
           “Integrated Security=True;MultipleActiveResultSets=True'”,
           bag);
      }
   }
}

Code 1

Furthermore this setting will be removed from the web application’s property bag while the feature is deactivating (Code 2).

The next challenging moment is to access that setting during runtime within the BDC model’s implementation classes (Picture 2). The code within the source-code files CustomerEntityService.cs and OrderEntityService.cs will not change too much (Code 3) as the hearth piece is relocated in the Utility.cs code-file (Code 4). So whenever the EntityConnection is needed, it is recreated based on the connection string set as application setting.

public override void FeatureDeactivating(SPFeatureReceiverProperties properties)
{
   IServiceLocator serviceLocator =
           SharePointServiceLocator.GetCurrent();
   IConfigManager configManager =
           serviceLocator.GetInstance<IConfigManager>();

    SPWebApplication webApplication = properties.Feature.Parent as SPWebApplication;
    if (webApplication != null)
    {
       SPSite siteCollection = webApplication.Sites[0];
       if (siteCollection != null)
       {
          configManager.SetWeb(siteCollection.RootWeb);
          IPropertyBag bag = configManager.GetPropertyBag (ConfigLevel.CurrentSPWebApplication);
          configManager.RemoveKeyFromPropertyBag(
               “NorthwindEntitiesConnectionString”, bag);
      }
   }
}

 

Code 2

image

Picture 2

EntityConnection conn = UtilityClass.BuildUpEntityConnection();

Code 3

public static EntityConnection BuildUpEntityConnection()
{
   IServiceLocator serviceLocator =
       SharePointServiceLocator.GetCurrent();
   IHierarchicalConfig config =
       serviceLocator.GetInstance<IHierarchicalConfig>();

   string connectionString;
   if (config.ContainsKey(“NorthwindEntitiesConnectionString”))
   {
      connectionString = config.GetByKey<string>(“NorthwindEntitiesConnectionString”);
      return new EntityConnection(connectionString);
   }
   return null;
}

 

Code 4

Here is the complete solution download (do not forget to adjust your project’s Site URL):

http://cid-8d365142bc4869ab.office.live.com/self.aspx/.Documents/EntityFrameworkBdcNw2.zip 

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Lifting more security restrictions

I believe this days’ software development became more like a hiking adventure in search of hidden paths and passageways. An average software developer could spend significant amount of time troubleshooting rather frustrating issues, due to

  • Not documented although assumed information (meaning you should know that!)
  • Not documented because somehow the authorities have forgotten to do so
  • Incomplete, wrong or misleading information

If you feel uncomfortable by the everywhere spread marketing material claiming ease of use and simplicity of this days products, it is not your fault while experiencing the exact contrary. The complexity just raises, the number of layers depending on each other is growing. The legends suggesting walks in heavens could turn out to be rather climbing on mountain walls.

As you have seen, my articles deal mostly with such gaps and burdens, and whenever one riddle is solved almost immediately a new one pops up, like here in Chapter 11. The author Sahil Malik expects the Dashboard Designer will launch (Building Solutions for SharePoint 2010) once selecting any PerformancePoint Content Library and you click New Item on the Items tab of the ribbon (Picture 1) and then select one of the items listed. Unfortunately it does NOT.

image

  Picture 1

This time the information is expected by default to be well known (meaning you should know that!). If you don’t feel so, here the link on msdn which teaches you why this issue is happening. So in this regard there is nothing new I could tell you, but my attempt is rather to follow up and document potential problems concerning the book’s chapters.

It is essential to understand, that each time you are going to add a new Item to the PerformancePoint Content Library a new instance of the Dashboard Designer is launched at the Client via ClickOnce Deployment. Therefore the remedy is enabling ClickOnce popups from SharePoint 2010 living hopefully within your trusted Zone. This means in other terms enabling ‘Automatic prompting for file downloads’ in IE. This could be done under Tools >> Internet Options >> Security >> Trusted sites >> Custom level (Picture 2). It is disabled by default. Confirming this change with OK, the Dashboard Designer launch will run like expected (Picture 3) just go back and repeat the steps within PerformancePoint Content Library. Another question could be, while it is, that on trusted sites default security policies prevent such download prompts?

image

Picture 2

image

Picture 3

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The file is corrupt and cannot be opened

Security is essential. The more sophisticated now days’ attacks the more poking around is needed preventing risks. Microsoft’s secure by design and secure by default paradigm comes however of some additional costs. The remediation expenses are sometimes higher than needed, due to completely misleading warnings or error messages.

Let say you publish an Excel workbook into SharePoint 2010 Excel Services and next you will try to open in Excel client that very same workbook clicking on  “Open in Excel” (Picture 1). The next moment you could be confronted with a puzzling error message stating “The file is corrupt and cannot be opened” (Picture 2). It is truly funny afterwards to see the “Was this information helpful?” link as well. Unfortunately the answer is thanks, not at all. As you can assume, the remedy is security related and could be done very easily.

image

Picture 1

image

Picture 2

In order to relax the by default set security settings, open Excel and in the backstage view click Options >> Trust Center >> Trust Center Settings… >> Protected View (Picture 3) and uncheck the Check boxes, click OK, OK. Close Excel and try opening your Excel Workbook again (Picture 1). This time the attempt will succeed.

image

Picture 3

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Cannot save ODC Files to SharePoint 2010 Document Library?

Life is not easy by any means while working towards the end of my SharePoint 2010 development book (Sahil Malik; Building Solutions for SharePoint 2010). I’m going to save a lot of wasted time for those who will follow this very same learning path.

Desktop Experience missing

In Chapter 11 page 319 you could face this cryptic instruction while trying to do the suggested Exercise “Once you have finished importing the data from SQL Server, choose to save the .odc file in a SharePoint “Data Connections Library” that you will need to create beforehand“. And this is by any means not as trivial as it sounds to be. First of all some basic prerequisites must apply, otherwise you are just doomed (like me was). Hence for make sure you have turned on Desktop Experience Feature. Many thanks in this last regard to Fabian Williams publishing the correct hints on his blog.

So check please first (Picture 1) that Desktop Experience Feature is installed on your system. This looks rather like a bad joke, as I couldn’t find any official hints how the Desktop Experience Feature is going to affect SharePoint Library publishing capabilities. Fabian Williams suggests it will install the WebDav-Protocol which is needed to make a SharePoint sites look like a file share. On the other side SharePoint is hosted in IIS and explicitly turning off WebDAV Publishing at IIS Role Services (Picture 2) will not affect in any way the publishing capabilities like described further below. I would appreciate any further hints to explain this optical discrepancy.

image

Picture 1

image

Picture 2

Let’s create now the Data Connection Library which will keep our Office Data Connection files. Therefore go to Site Actions >> More Options >> Filter by >> Library and take the “Data Connection Library” template (Picture 3). Add some compelling name and click lastly the Create button. Please note, do not try to do this via Site Actions >> New Document Library.

image

Picture 3

This way the Library is prepared and waiting for some ODC file to be uploaded (presumably via WebDav right?). You could now open up Excel and the existing Data Connection perhaps already created. Click thereafter the “Data ” pane and select Connections (Picture 4).

image

Picture 4

In the Workbook Connections Dialog Box click “Properties…” then the Definition tab and thereafter click the “Export Connection File…” button sitting at the bottom of the dialog (Picture 5). The Save As Dialog Box will appear whereas you could insert the previously created Data Connection Library’s http-link (Picture 6). Clicking the Save button would let you see the “Path does not exist” error message which could have been driving you crazy without knowing that the Desktop Experience has to be turned on.

image

Picture 5

image

Picture 6

The sign of good luck is to see the Web File Properties dialog appearing on the screen (Picture 7). Thereafter you could diligently change the Title add the Description and Keywords as well. The only minor problem remains (which looks for me rather like a bug) that changing the Title, this will be not reflected while browsing to the targeted Library (Picture 8). This however could be worked around additionally editing the properties of this uploaded item in the document library.

image

Picture 7

image

Picture 8

The author’s further instruction is again not precise enough. He suggests “At this point, Excel will prompt you to import the data as either a table, a pivot table, or a pivot table and pivot chart“. Unfortunately this is simply not accurate. Following the steps, after saving the ODC file into the dedicated Library within SharePoint, you rather have firstly to close Excel and reopen it again. After Excels opens up go to the Data pane and click on Existing Connections (Picture 9) and from the Dialog Box select the Orders you just saved previously.  This is the moment the Import Data Dialog Box will show up whereas you could select the “PivotChart and PivotTable Report” option (Picture 10).

image

Picture 9

image

Picture 10

Formatting and publishing the Spreadsheet

Arriving at this point you could see right now a view similar to Picture 11. Start drag & drop on the right hand side “ShipCountry” to the Report filter Box (Picture 11). Next drag & drop “ShipCity” and “ShippedDate” into the Axis Fields Box and lastly drag & drop the “Freight” filed into the “Σ Values” Box. Lastly you could change the bar chart to line graph selecting the Design pane and clicking on “Change Chart Type” (Picture 12).

image

Picture 11

image

Picture 12

Furthermore on Page 320 we can find an error depicted in the Figure 11-11. The problem could be that Sahil Malik is rather a passionate developer like me and less likely an Excel freak. So while following the instructions be careful while adding the “Difference from Average” column.

image

Here how to do it correctly. Firstly just type that Title into the cell C3 and thereafter let collapse all the cities below “Row Labels” column. This makes sure all US cities’ “Sum of Freight” will be placed into the cells starting (top to bottom) from B4 to B15 (Picture 13). Next select the cell C4 which right now should be empty, and type into the formula bar “=B4-AVERAGE(B4:B15)” like Picture 14 shows.

image

Picture 13

image

Picture 14

Next please do not repeat the mistake the author did, namely making copy & paste of this formula over all selected cells (meaning C5 to C15). Doing so you would get the same wrong results like in the book’s Figure 11-11. For example in the book for the city Walla Walla the difference value –6875.945 is displayed which is wrong. Why? Let’s make first an average over the fright values. Average(B4:15) = 1147,6075, so the correct difference for Walla Walla is 19.4 – 1147,6075 = 1128.2075. The book’s mistake here is that doing Copy & Paste will increment all cell coordinates. Therefore for the cell C5 the formula will be B5 – AVERAGE(B5:B16), for the next cell it is incremented to B6 – AVERAGE(B6:B17) and so on. What we actually need, that the AVERAGE(B4:B15) remains constant while only the formula’s  left hand side cell coordinates become incremented.

In order to have conditional formatting select the cells C4 to C15 and click on Home pane. Next click on “Conditional Formatting” in the Ribbon and choose “Data Bars/Gradient Fill” (Picture 15). Here green color is for above average freights and red bar depicts below average freights.

image

Picture 15

At this point you have to create in SharePoint a Document Library, this time via Site Actions >> New Document Library and taking “Microsoft Excel spreadsheet” as document template. Name this Library like “Sheets”. Next you could publish the created Charts into that Library. Switch back to Excel and in the backstage view File publish the created chart via Save & Send >> Save to Share Point >> Browse for a Location >> Save As (Picture 16). This time we know that the target location is composed of http://<server>/<path>/Sheet + Book1.xlsx

image

Picture 16

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Cannot publish Visio Web Drawing to SharePoint 2010?

 

Sometimes it is somewhat hard to proceed smoothly with the SharePoint stuff. I do not know what the true causes of incompletely provided instructions are. Haste perhaps? Here the next struggle with Visio Services from Chapter 11 (Sahil Malik; Building Solutions for SharePoint 2010). On page 317 you are asked to publish your Visio drawing directly into SharePoint. The absolutely simply task is “…in the backstage view of Visio 2010 , click on Save & Send\Save to SharePoint\Save  Web Drawing (Data refreshable drawing for use with Visio Services on SharePoint). Choose to save it at http://sp2010/Visio Diagrams.”

So the instruction looks well, the only problem is, that while clicking on the “Save As” button (Picture 1), there is no way to browse any http-locations except file-system locations (Picture 2). And the puzzling starts, meaning whether the author is asking me to do something by mistake or so? Even the button’s Icon reflects file-system locations.

Later on I learn, that Visio’s recently discussed Windows went through modifications from Beta to RTM Visio 2010 – Changes from Beta to RTM (Picture 1a). This means the Author could have reflected some “mid-beta” view whereas both the button’s icon and Text makes clear what the true attempt is. This is nice to see, however still no solution for my problem.

image

Picture 1 (RTM Visio 2010 view)

Picture 1a (Beta stage Visio 2010 view)

image

Picture 2

Later somehow by a chance I have figured the right answer. Just simply copy the site URL to the File name Text Box in the Save As window. It would be able to save the drawing to the SharePoint site location (Picture 3). Wow! Thereafter in subsequent attempts to save data to that location the Save As Dialog Windows’s view changes completely (Picture 4) in order to reflect the well known http-location. That is. Have a good night anyway Smile

image

Picture 3

image

Picture 4

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Chapter 10 Challenge; Workflows sending Email

1. Introduction

The diligent student arriving at Page 302 (Sahil Malik; Building Solutions for SharePoint 2010) is confronted with a very innocently sounding sentence stating “Once the workflow has finished, and assuming that you have your SMTP server configured, you should receive an e-mail with the necessary reminder“. The only problem appears to be the simple fact, that following the Author’s instructions, no such configuration was announced hence fore you could turn the page and ignore or take actions and additionally setup your development machine in order to be able sending and receiving emails.

I was rather trying to fix the SMTP issue in order to have a machine with emailing capability. First of all however let me summarize the options in this regard. My list could be incomplete and perhaps there are even more possibilities recently I’m recently not aware of.

2. Microsoft’s IW Demo Image

Perhaps the best option to play around with e-mailing within SharePoint 2010 is to use the professionally setup Hyper-V Image provided by Microsoft. You could download two machines, one is a DC (contoso.com) with Visual Studio 2010, Office Professional Plus 2010 and more installed. The second machines is a domain joined server with Exchange Server 2010 running, thus the environment seems to be perfect for 180 days of evaluation:

2010 Information Worker Demonstration and Evaluation Virtual Machine (RTM)

Let’s see what else we could do in order to preserve the book’s original machine. What we would like to have is a running SMTP Server and a POP3 Service. The first one should be not a problem as Windows Server 2008 R2 supports this feature. The problem seems to be that POP3 has been depreciated and will no longer be supplied as part of the Windows OS. Although POP3 was introduced with Windows Server 2003, Microsoft removed it after including it in just one generation of the OS.

3. Smtp4dev

One very simply looking solution could be according Rob Wilson’s suggestion, to only setup SMTP and instead of any POP3 Service installed, use simply an SMTP traffic sniffle (named smtp4dev), which captures sent emails without actually sending them. Thus you will be able to monitor whether e-mails have been sent. This is perhaps for demo purposes only as the solution does not allow you to maintain POP3 mailboxes on the machine.

4. HMailServer POP3

Furthermore I have discovered a setup posted by Lavinia (SharePoint 2010 Incoming/Outgoing Email Settings for Dev Environment), who suggests to use a third party POP3 Service named HMailServer. I have never tried this way and thus cannot tell anything more. Unfortunately the article does not clearly define, whether the Windows OS provided SMTP Server has to be turned on/off or/and HMailServer provides out-of-the-box it’s own SMTP Server. 

5. MailEnable POP3

Another article suggests using MailEnable Standard Edition (free) as POP3 Service. This was a nice looking alternative. I was optimistic and started evaluating this solution. The mailboxes were working fine, however it was problem setting up in SP2010 Central Administration incoming and outgoing email configuration. I was facing a warning, that SMTP Server is needed for doing so. MailEnable however provides it’s own SMTP infrastructure so I was rather puzzled. I was therefore trying to configure the out-of-the-box available OS Level SMTP Server, which however couldn’t be started. Assuming there is a conflict between those SMTP Services, I just promptly stopped with the evaluation concluding as rather dead end.

6. Visendo SMTP Extender

Lastly I figured this promising SMTP/POP3 configuration (Installing and configuring SMTP and POP3 e-mail for sharepoint 2010) based on the Visendo POP3 Extender for Windows 2008 Server. Please note while trying to download from the provider’s web site, select the “Visendo SMTP Extender” from the list, which is free.  It is important to note, that better you follow exactly the steps provided in the article. My first attempt’s failure was overlooking one particular SMTP Configuration step, whereas it is suggested to create an Alias entry  (Picture 1).

Picture 1

At the end of the day I could confirm, this solution worked for me, however by far not as reliable as expected (see more at the end of this article). The Site-List Workflow based on the book’s Chapter 10 sends the confirmation E-Mail (Picture 2) correctly.

image

Picture 2

7. Configure Administrator’s Profile

The configuration jungle however does not end succeeding to configure SMTP/POP3 on your development machine. Instead of sending and receiving emails you could see a rather alarming SharePoint 2010 message stating “You do not have an e-mail address” (Picture 3). Based on my poking arounds, here below I will provide you the checkpoints which helped me to resolve this issue.

Picture 3

The problem seems to be specific for developers following the book author’s examples. You are probably signed on as your domain’s administrator however without explicitly configured user profile. Hence for go to Central Administration >> Application Management >> Manage Service Applications and look for “User Profile Service Application” (Picture 4). Proceeding with “Manage User Profiles” type administrator into the Find profiles dialog input and click the Find button (Picture 5).

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Picture 4

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Picture 5

The administrator’s freshly find profile should appear. Click on “Edit My Profile” (Picture 5) and scroll down to “Work e-mail ” field which is presumably empty for your administrator’s account. Type-in now the correct e-mail and proceed with the form’s “Save and Close”.

Next this newly provided information has to be synchronized with SharePoint as well. Go for this reason to Central Administration >> Monitoring >> Review Job definitions and look for the “User profile Service Application – User profile SharePoint Full Synchronization” job (Picture 6), which is by default scheduled to run hourly. Select that job and click on the “Run Now” button. image

Picture 6

Check whether the changes will apply. Open-up your Workflow list now in SharePoint and in the upper right corner check both “My Profile” and “My Settings” (Picture 7). The provided e-mail address has to there in both cases. If that is not the case, something went terribly wrong and before proceeding start analyzing and resolving.  Otherwise well done, you will be able getting e-mail notifications while that mentioned above Site-Workflow completes.

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Picture 7

One more thing has to be noted . Emails are sent from SharePoint 2010 not immediately, even you ask to do so. There are dedicated SharePoint Jobs for each WebApplication (Picture 8) named “Immediate Alerts” scheduled to run by default every 5 minutes or so. You could run these jobs immediately from Central Administration >> Monitoring >> Review Job definitions. 

image

Picture 8 (Alerts dedicated to Web Applications listening on ports 80 and 801)

8. SMTP/POP3 Extender problems

The annoying problem with this recently configured solution is (tested on two separate virtual images) that e-mail routing works not reliable. What I have seen is that e-mails are created and sent each time as expected. The messages are dropped into the pre-configured folder at  “c:\intetpub\mailroot\drop” (Picture 9) however the POP3 Extender looks like is not each time willing to pickup these emails. Sometimes the messages are forwarded into the target folders, sometimes not. Not forwarded/processed messages will disappear after a few seconds without ever arriving at any destination. The behavior is a real curiosity, as clicking with the mouse on the .eml file in the “…\mailroot\drop” folder will trigger the correct delivery. So in order to make sure the emails are sent, monitor in windows explorer the drop-folder and if any email arrives there, quickly click it (kick it) and the delivery succeeds. Very strange indeed! If anyone is aware of some remedy, would be more then delighted to hear some good news in this regards.

image

Picture 9

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Chapter 10 (Workflow Forms) Headaches

Guess please honestly the percentage of your effective work. I mean effective that part of your work, whenever you are not forced to desperately hunt and fix errors caused by misleading or incomplete information. Surprised? Starting with this chapter of my favor book (Sahil Malik; Building Solutions for SharePoint 2010) my effectiveness dropped dramatically. On page 299 the author asks you to open some InfoPath form within SharePoint 2010 Designer, which however does not exist. I have started reading the chapter from the very beginning, perhaps missed some important point (effectiveness thus less then 50%). I have repeated the exercises, still no forms under the “Form” section like stated. Then poking around in the web I figured some articles experiencing the very same issue (effectiveness 30%) then searching alternatively lastly I figured in this discussion the resolution (effectiveness now around 15%).

Here the steps to do for my followers being in the same desperation. The issue is to create a copy of an existing workflow and make some changes on that copy. First of all open SharePoint 2010 Designer and connect to the appropriate Site which contains the preconfigured list associated with an out-of-the-box Approval Workflow. So right mouse button on that Workflow and select “Copy and Modify…” (Picture 1) and let’s name it “Approval Extra-Copy”.

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Picture 1

Edit now this new Copy clicking on “Approval Workflow Task (en-US) Copy” (Picture 2) or just proceed with the steps according the the book’s example. Lastly save the Copy using the “Floppy” style Save button in the ribbon. This will cause the Copy appears in the List of  “Reusable Workflows” (Picture 3). You see here as well the ineffectively created copies while trying to fix this issue at my own…

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Picture 2

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Picture 3

Let’s click on this new Approval Extra-Copy Workflow and check the Forms pane on the right hand side within the Designer whereas the list is empty (Picture 4). The easy to use remedy is one single mandatory action Sahil Malik have forgotten to tell us, namely prior to proceed with InfoPath Form editing, you have to Publish the newly created Workflow (Picture 5). This will cause the Forms to be regenerated and voila, the Forms pane becomes filled with the missing InfoPath items (Picture 6). Have a good day anyway Smile

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Picture 4

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Picture 5

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Picture 6

And lastly regarding Visio 2010 in order to be more effective then me. This book’s chapter asks you to open the formerly exported from SharePoint 2010 Designer Workflow. This could be the source of another headaches, as using Visio 2010 Professional edition you will miss the stencils and templates needed to design SharePoint 2010 Workflows. So go ahead and install Visio 2010 Premium. If you have msdn Subscription, don’t be surprised figuring only a single Visio 2010 Image/exe there. Applying the appropriate product key will decide what edition is lastly turned on your system. Professional edition can be easily upgraded starting the installation and choosing “Enter a Product Key” (Picture 7).

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Picture 7

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